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When you work in the audio field where you’re producing content, editing the audio for production quality or inspecting audio issues at a production facility, you need equipment that can go where you go. When a small factory needs an audio professional to test their production equipment and end products to ensure they’re meeting their standards, then they need both personnel and their equipment to be portable.

Let’s look at what the options are for professionals who work in the audio field in editing or testing.

Getting Out on the Production Line

For freelance audio technicians who are specialists in their field, they often like to bring their own equipment. When accuracy is critical, then trusting someone else’s gear just won’t cut it. They’re responsible for the testing and outcomes, with decisions to roll back production until an audio issue on a circuit board or some other areas can be properly addressed. As such, these decisions are costly for those companies affected; their decisions must be right.

Testing audio equipment and manufactured boards and other actions using hardware from Avermetrics or other providers ensures that manufactured products meet the quality specifications that the eager buyers expect of the company. After all, it’s far more affordable to pay for an audio specialist to verify that there isn’t a problem than to cover the cost of a product recall when an issue is only detected after the product has been produced, launched, distributed and already sold to thousands of buyers.

Audio Editing on the Fly

When wanting to edit audio on the fly without traveling with audio mixing decks and other specialized, bulky audio equipment, then going digital with audio editing tools is the way to go. You’ll want to use a multi-track software editor that enables you to access more than one track and splice in different parts as needed. Access to different audio formats is dependent on the software used and the licenses to access different audio formats. For instance, some audio editing apps have to add other audio decoders, plugins or addons to access MP3, APE or FLAC audio files.

Audacity is an interesting and popular cross-platform audio editor which has many useful features. It is open-source and the software’s development is ongoing. It runs on Windows, Mac OS and Linux, so an audio editor can use it on different laptops and desktop configurations at their home office, studio or on the road. Many people are familiar with Audacity as it is used for everything from editing up podcast interviews to demo music tracks and beyond.

Live Track Audio Editing

Live track audio editing is another useful feature that only some audio editors provide. The purpose here is to improve the audio quality of a live performance as it’s happening. A traditional large mixing desk at a gig or venue can perform this function, but failing that, it can be done digitally now too. Along with software like Audacity which handles live performance editing, recording studio software such as Magix Music Maker is a popular choice too.

Whether you work as an audio technician checking on the audio quality of products coming out of manufacturing facilities or you are an audio editor, having the right equipment and software matters a great deal. For these kinds of jobs, you’re only as good as your tools.

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